Luciano Caixeta

 

Q1. What have been your greatest successes (physically, mentally or emotionally) since you began? How does your body feel now compared to when you started and WHY?

I don’t think I have a single variable that I can point out as the “most improved” since I began CrossFit. I definitely improved physically — I can move more weight now than when I started because of not only pure strength but also because of technique work. Mentally, CrossFit has been my “escape valve” to the stresses of work – when I am working out I unplug for an hour or so and that helps with my mental health. All in all, the WODs and the CrossFit community helped me in both ways and I cannot describe one as more important than the other.

 

I have been doing CrossFit for over 5 years now and to me the thing that makes me the happiest is the fact that my left shoulder does not hurt as much as it did when I started. It is pretty common in my line of work to have a lot of “wear and tear” on our shoulders because cows are a massive animal that can throw you around easily. Despite that all the overhead work we do on a regular basis has helped me on getting stronger shoulders that can take more of a beating and I don’t feel it hurting anymore.
Disclaimer: I am not a bull rider! I know that many people think that all Brazilians ride bulls, but I don’t do it. That is not what I meant when I mentioned my line of work. It is actually something way less impressive.

Q2. How has your life changed since starting CrossFit training? Has CrossFit transferred over into any other areas of your life?

One thing that CrossFit definitely changed in my life was my schedule. Sometimes I feel like I am planning my days around my CrossFit work outs. Another thing that CrossFit occasionally changes in my life is my ability to go up and down stairs.
CrossFit not only helped me with aches and pains work and age related, but also gave me many friends.

Q3. What are the advantages of CrossFit style training compared to your previous workout styles?

Working out at a regular gym was really boring. Training was monotonous, and I hated the people grunting and doing stupid exercises (Oh, can’t forget mirrors and the guys starring at their arms). Now, every day is something different (besides the Thanksgiving WOD and the 12 days of Xmas – both painful) and I am forced to do the exercises/movements that I don’t like (previously I would just skip it). Besides it is a class and you are never working out on your own.

Q4. What advice can you give to others?

We have a saying in Brazil that says “If advice was a good thing you would sell it instead of giving it for free!” but here it goes for what it is worth it: we need to know our body limitations and be patient. If we cannot do a movement or a heavy lift one day we just need to keep working on it until we conquer this challenge. By knowing our body we will not try something that is way too much and will possibly get us hurt. How is that for advice?

Athlete Specific Q.
1) When is the wedding?

2) You are known around DNR as the gym bully, how did you get this reputation?

3) Does the above, have anything to do with your ethnic swagger days at Cornell University?

1) Wedding is December 2nd, 2017

2) I am not known as the “gym bully”, I was labeled as the “gym bully” by Coach Bre and Coach Marie (and to me, that is bullying and I am the victim not the malefactor) – that is different!
It all started when I was cheering Coach Bre and then athlete Marie during a WOD that both of them were “sand-bagging”. I was just trying to help and instead of taking it nicely they twisted my words and made me the bad guy in this story. That is how I got this reputation — really unfair!

 

3) You know, going to an Ivy League school may have taught me that wearing chubbies, button down shirt or polos, and boat shoes in public is acceptable. But no, it did not have anything to do with my attitude especially because I am not a bully. Yet, as you all know, I am very proud of my Cornell and I have endless options of Cornell gear. Go Big Red!